Easing Back Pain Naturally

How Back Pain Starts

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When considering back pain we must concern ourselves with its variants. For instance, back pain can start with slip disks, which in medical terms is called “Herniated nucleus pulposa.” (HNP) Doctors define slip disks as ruptures of the “intervertebral disk.” The intervertebral rests between the vertebrae (Spinal Column) of the backbone.

The interruption has variants, including the “Lumbrosacral,” (L4 and L5) as well as cervical C5-7. The cervical is at the neck and belongs to other parts of the back and neck as well. When doctors consider slip disks they often look through etiology, which includes neck and back strains, trauma, congenital/inborn bone malformation, heavy lifting, degenerated disks, and/or weakness of ligaments.

After carefully considering, etiology doctors consider Pathophysiology, which includes protrusions of the “nucleus pulposus.” The center connects to the column or spinal canal and perhaps compressing the spinal cord or the nerve core, or roots, which causes back pain. If the spinal cord is compressed restraining the roots and cord often back pain, numbness, and the motor functions may fail.

The assessments in medical terms are based on Lumbrosacral, which may include acute or chronic pain in the lower back. The pain may spread out to the buttocks and move toward the legs. The person may feel weakness, as well as numbness. In addition, such pain can cause tingling around the legs and foot. The final assessment may include ambulation, which emerges from pain.

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The cervical is considered. The symptoms experts look for are neck rigidity, deadness, weakness, and “tingling of the” hands. If the neck pain spreads the pain down to the arms and continues to the hands, experts will consider slip disks. Yet other symptoms may occur, such as weakness that affects the farthest points, or the higher boundaries of the body. The lumbar curves are at the lower back region and are situated in the loins or the smaller area of the back, which doctors consider also, especially if the patient has difficulty straightening this area with the curvature of the spine (scoliosis) and away from the area influenced.

When doctors consider back pain, they will review the diagnostics after conducting a series of tests. Diagnostics may arise from tendon reflex, x-rays, EMG, myelograms, CSF, and/or Laséque signs. CSF helps the doctor to analyze the increases in protein while EMG assists experts in viewing the involvement of the spinal nerves. X-rays are used to help experts see the narrow disk space. Tendon reflexes are tested, which the doctors use tests to look deep into the depressed region, or the absent upper boundary reflexes, or in medical lingo the Achilles’ reactions or reflex. Myelograms assist the expert in seeing if the spinal cord is compressed. The tests start if the Laséque signs show positive results behind etiology findings, Pathophysiology, assessments, and so on.

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How doctors manage slip disks:

Doctors prescribe management in medical schemes to isolate or relieve back pain. The management schemes may include diet whereas the calories are set according to the patient’s metabolic demands. The doctor may increase fiber intake, as well as force fluids.

Additional treatment or management may include hot pads, moisture, etc, as well as hot compressions. Doctors often recommend pain meds as well, such as those with NAID. The pain meds include Motrin, Naproxen, Dolobid, or Diflunisal, Indocin, ibuprofen, and so on. Additional meds may include muscle Relaxers, such as Flexeril and Valiums. The common Relaxers are diazepam and cyclobenzaprine hydrochloride, which diazepam is valiums and the other Flexeril.

Orthopedic mechanisms are also prescribed to reduce back pain, which include cervical collars and back braces.

Thankfully there are many natural muscle relaxers available to alleviate discomfort.

1. CHAMOMILE

Chamomile is frequently found in tea and supplements. It is an herbal remedy that contains flavonoids, a compound lauded for its anti-inflammatory qualities. Therefore, Chamomile essential oils are used in massages to soothe discomfort.

2. CHERRY JUICE

Cherries are powerful antioxidants. They help to alleviate muscle pain that occurs after intense exercise. Cherry juice is available commercially or made at home.

3. BLUEBERRY

According to recent studies, blueberries consumed before and after exercise can aid in recovery and help prevent muscle soreness and tension by decreasing oxidative stress. Like cherries, they are rife with antioxidants, one of the best combatants of muscle soreness.

4. CAYENNE

Capsaicin is the active ingredient in cayenne peppers. It gives them their spicy kick. This spice also relaxes muscles naturally. Plus, it’s often added to many dishes! It’s also available widely in creams and ointments and will alleviate spasms when applied over the offending area.

5. VITAMIN D

Often the muscle pain we experience is due to a deficiency, and vitamin D is a frequent culprit. Found in eggs, milk, and fatty fish, the lack of this essential vitamin can cause muscle and nerve pain to worsen. This is especially the case in sufferers of fibromyalgia.

6. MAGNESIUM

A mineral renowned for its ability to calm spasming muscle tissue, magnesium-rich foods include bananas, brown rice, and almonds, and can also aid in nerve damage.

7. REST

Maybe you’ve just been going too hard! Sleep, fluids, and relaxation can do wonders for an overworked body, by easing the tension associated with overworked muscle tissue. Heating pads and ice packs can also aid in the process of recovery. Therefore, allowing your body ample time to rebuild and rejuvenate.

Not all natural muscle relaxers will work for everyone. It may take some trial and error to find the right one for you. 

Exercise for back pain relief

A few tips to keep in mind before you get started

  • Try to hold each stretch for at least 10 seconds and preferably 30 seconds or longer. The pain-relieving benefits will increase the longer you hold these stretches.
  • Rather than rush through the moves, Costello recommends turning on soothing music and using this stretching time as a chance to relax and renew.
  • Don’t forget to breathe! It may sound silly, but it will help with any feelings of discomfort.

Child’s Pose

This common yoga posture gently stretches the muscles of the low back, which are likely contracted if you’re in pain.

How to do it: Begin on your hands and knees on the floor, with your hands under your shoulders and knees under your hips. Reach out directly in front of you, extending your arms and placing your palms flat on the floor. Slowly sit your hips back toward your heels, dropping your head and chest downward as your arms extend further. If this stretch is too much, place a pillow under your belly to prop yourself up a bit and lessen the stretch of the low back muscles. Stay here 20 to 30 seconds or even longer.

Lower-Back Twist

This movement not only helps to stretch your lower back but also your glutes, which can tighten when you’re experiencing low back pain, ultimately causing more pain.

How to do it: Begin by lying on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Extend your arms out to the side in a “T” position. Keep your shoulders on the ground as you gently roll both knees to one side. Stay here 20 to 30 seconds, then return to the starting position and repeat on the other side. If the stretch is too much for you, place a pillow or stack of blankets under your knees when you twist to each side.

Knee-to-Chest Stretch

Similar to the other stretches here, this move lengthens contracted low back muscles.

How to do it: Begin by lying on your back with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Bring your hands to rest either behind your knees or right below your kneecaps. Slowly bring both knees toward your chest, using your hands to gently pull your knees. Hold here 20 to 30 seconds, then return to starting position.

The Pelvic Tilt

When you’re suffering from lower-back pain, you might feel as if your entire pelvic area is immovable. This stretch can help you start to bring some movement back to this area gently.

How to do it: Begin by lying on the floor with your knees bent and feet flat on the floor. Try to relax your low back, keeping it in a neutral position (which means you should feel a slight curve in your low back if you place the top of your hand under your back). Turn “on” your core muscles and then flatten your low back against the floor by slightly tilting your pelvis upward. Repeat 12 to 15 times.

Cat/Cow Stretch

How to do it: Begin on your hands and knees on the floor, with your hands under your shoulders and knees under your hips. Your spine should be parallel to the ground in this position. Then, round your back, stretching your mid-back between your shoulder blades—similar to how a cat stretches by rounding its back. Hold for 5 seconds, then relax and let your stomach fall downward as you gently arch your low back and hold here for 5 seconds. Repeat these movements for 30 seconds or longer.

Using Hot or cold for back and neck pain.

The rule is: first 48 hours, ice. After hot packs.
A great hot pack. Take an old sock, fill with rice. Knot the end.
Put into microwave for 2 minutes or so. Will last for 15 minutes, and with the long shape, will wrap around neck and shoulders nicely.
Always be careful when you microwave rice though, because it may come out TOO hot.

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